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Monthly Archives: April 2011

We in Canada have an upcoming election; and it is hoped all around that Canadians VOTE for change.

In other less fortunate parts of the world governments don’t let their people vote because they do not want to lose dictatorial power. This is true in LIBYA SYRIA CHINA North Korea and Myanmar. The people recently demonstrated against a corrupt government in Egypt and won.
People can win only by being united.

You Don’t Want Change Don’t Vote. WE are fighting a war in Afghanistan don’t make those lives lost a waste.

The video is somewhat graphic but it depicts the reality of oppression of what is really happening in less fortunate parts the world. Savour your freedom. Many have fought for it.
filmed with d7000 and post processed in imovie

Issues you might want to consider are:

1. The protection of our West Coast Salmon Fishery.
2. Offshore property ownership of Canada
3. The Tar Sands in Alberta
4. Harm Reduction in Downtown Vancouver.
5. The proposed pipeline to Prince Rupert from Alberta
6. Oil/Development Tanker traffic on the west coast of British Columbia.
7. The Kyoto Protocol
8. The Prosperity Mine Proposal and The Destruction of Fish Lake (85000 trout) in the Chilcotin
9. Support of the Grizzly Bear Trophy Hunt in British Columbia

I believe most of these issues are of concern for the livable future of all Canadians.

Have you heard of them, do you care, have your candidates addressed these issues? The present conservative government has not.

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Here’s some recent news from my geologist buddy Marco.

The plate displacement during the recent Japan quake was roughly 27 metres, of which 7 metres were vertical movement, so the starter wave was already that high. The wave made it more than 10 miles inland in places. A wave traveling through deep water will not change its wavelength while its traveling, but only once it hits the shallows. The travel time is quite extreme, pretty well 1000 kph, or slightly less, so in the case of the Cascadia fault, the wave would arrive only 5 minutes later on the West Coast of Vancouver island. The Japanese fault is pretty close to the same distance the Cascadia Fault lays from Vancouver Island. Kind of sobering if you think about around the campfire on Vargas Island in the Clayoquot.

Don’t move to Richmond or any delta or riverine areas in the lower mainland with sediment deposition. Read what happened in Japan. If the big one comes jiggle jiggle sink sink. water and soil becomes one. Mud.

The duration of the Japanese earthquake, about five minutes, could be the key to the severity of the liquefaction and may force researchers to reconsider the extent of liquefaction damage possible.
“With such a long-lasting earthquake, we saw how structures that might have been okay after 30 seconds just continued to sink and tilt as the shaking continued for several more minutes,” Ashford said. “And it was clear that younger sediments, and especially areas built on recently filled ground, are much more vulnerable.”
An event almost exactly like Japan’s is expected in the Pacific Northwest from the Cascadia Subduction Zone, and the new findings make it clear that liquefaction will be a critical issue in the young soils there.
“Young” sediments, in geologic terms, are those deposited within the past 10,000 years or so.
“Entire structures were tilted and sinking into the sediments, even while they remained intact,” said Ashford, who is based in Corvallis, Ore. “The shifts in soil destroyed water, sewer and gas pipelines, crippling the utilities and infrastructure these communities need to function. We saw some places that sank as much as 4 feet,” or 1.2 meters.

Water mercurial malleable a cold weight bent by the tide waiting for the monthly moon to dodge and skip the stars — here no wind.

Clematis in floral arrangement. Its been such a cool spring that the sprigs of this vine are just shooting through the soil now.

don’t feel especially wordy like these flowers though something lush and robust about them like kiwi fruit the soft first bite pastel and yielding tip of tang

Andy always had a look up attitude. Hope you do too.

This is a valley. It is glacial. Carved out eons ago. A big U-shaped valley. It’s called Tchaikazan.