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Monthly Archives: March 2010

Stay with me for details for this one. Leaving October this year. Photo Trek to Langtang Himal from Kathmandu.
Digital photography of unique mountain cultures in villages rarely seen off the normal travelers track.
All logistics taken care of. Good food porters mountain lodges for digital debrief sessions. Multiple base camps for day trips to specific areas. 4 to 6 photographers accepted.

Details are below click the Photo

Anahim Stampede .. I remember rudimentary bleachers in July of that year from Tweedsmuir in the back of beyond with fox and fog, tarns and stone caches, the falls out of Turners’ Lake and 89 switchbacks in an area we have both visited since but just not the same… as it was.

This used to be a real rocking, real cowboy stampede that was considerably more authentic than Calgary’s. It might be still.
My ticket is faded and wrinkly now.

Location Hwy 20 East of Bella Coola, East of the Rainbow Range, West of Williams Lake, West of Riske Creek, West of Hanceville (Lees Corner), West of Tatla Lake … go to the Chilcotin the glacial upland of the Fraser Plateau.

Read this magazine it’s great ….. and Canadian.

Here is my comment going to letters to the editor; regarding “Bystanders” a short story by Steven Heighton. (Just have word that this will be published in next issue its out now May10 2010 great article on hockey by MacFarland)

In response to Steven Heighton’s Short Fiction “Bystanders”

A similar event largely unreported, occurred in Fall 2006 on the Tibet-china Nepal border at Nangpa Pass.

Innocents, Tibetan refugees including children and a nun were murdered by Chinese soldiers, shot from a distance slow moving targets in thigh deep snow in full view of a guided western climbing expedition.

The leader of this expedition balked at interfering/reporting the incident concerned he would loose economically.

Several of his guides under the threat of employment termination leaked the story to miniscule response from western press and governments.

Heighton’s piece metaphorically responds that we can not idly standby taking no action personally or nationally as ineffectual bystanders.

Many Thanks to Steven for making us think. Now all we have to do is act.

Walrus Published Letter Here

“I want world sympathy in the battle of of right against unright.” Gandhi 5.4/1930

Greg Maurer Photographer alpenglowpro.wordpress.com

Russell Hallbauer, CEO of Taseko (Prosperity) Mines wants to drain FISH LAKE, between world class Yohetta Valley/Chilko Lake-Ts’yl-os and Big Creek Provincial Parks and remove 85000 existing rainbow trout and create a tailings pond.

Do you want him to create “Prosperity Lake” with bigger and better fish after the mine has used the original lake for toxic tailings?

Hmmm I wonder why they called the lake Fish in the first place?

BC Government and its Liberal funded Environmental Assessment Office support this travesty.

The protection of Teztan Biny Fish Lake an issue for the local First Nations people, it is an issue for ALL Canadians.  Teztan Biny is only one of a number of freshwater lakes across this country of ours that is slated for extinction in the interests of corporate mining. In other words, our governments are allowing the “right to mine” to supersede the rights of local inhabitants to protect their water resources for future generations.

Yes corporate man should manipulate nature and local inhabitants sense of place for economic gain … do you agree?

There were log beachcombers years ago like the TV Series with Bruno Gerussi. But generally I think now it is not cost effective to operate such a business due to gov’t and mill regulations.

The rates paid for salvaged logs in a direct sale will vary from GLS rates. When invoicing a direct sale, GLS checks pricing to ensure fairness.
Salvaged logs are generally of lower value than fresh green timber. A major reason for the lower value is the refusal of some mills to consume salvaged logs. This narrows the market considerably. The mills are afraid of hitting metal, despite the best efforts of salvors and receiving stations to eliminate this hazard. Also, salvaged timber can be toredo damaged, beach worn or have sand impregnated cracks.

If you want this one, which has probably escaped from a boom in recent storm action go to the east side of Gabriola Island… it is de-barked and ready to be milled looks like fir and is pretty straight.

According to Ministry of Forests in Nanaimo the log if it is fir and and D grade it is likely worth around 400 CDN but you need a 250 CDN permit a boat gear to get it to a mill to collect.

Check this old trail map from the 1860’s; also note that Vancouver burned to the ground 20 years later in June 1886.

Note that Hastings, was located at what now is New Brighton Park. A memorial plaque and cedar stump are now what is left of the small townsite .

January 15, 1886 On January 15, 1886 the first issue of The Vancouver Herald appeared, the city’s first newspaper. Note that it bears the name ‘Vancouver’ more than two months before incorporation. One interesting item was an advertisement placed by George Black, proprietor of the Brighton Hotel at Hastings, B.C. That hotel was located at what is now the north foot of Windermere Street.

“This fine and commodious new Hotel,” the ad read, “has been recently completed, and is furnished with every convenience for the comfort of guests. The situation and accommodations are unsurpassed on Burrard Inlet, which has become the most fashionable WATERING-PLACE in British Columbia. The prospect is charming, the sea breezes are invigorating, and the facilities for Boating and Bathing are excellent. Private sitting and dining rooms. Suites of apartments for families or parties.

“The Bar is entirely detached from the main building.

“First-class stabling and feed for horses.

“Buses to and from New Westminster twice a day.”

We think the “buses” referred to are what we would call stagecoaches. The Herald’s last issue would be October 12, 1887.
from http://www.vancouverhistory.ca